Serbia is Saved! Late WWI Serbian Infantry (1916-18)

Continuing my Strelets Serbian infantry winter figures, I’m pleased to announce that I’ve now completed the final dozen figures remaining in the box! The first group of figures demonstrated the early war uniform. These figures all wear the French Adrian helmet rather than the Serbian šajkača hat. Furthermore, some of these also have the French Chauchat light machine gun. So this dates them to the post-1915 period.

Late War Serbian Infantry (15)

History, 1915-18:

After Serbia had successfully repelled the invasion in 1914, they were once more attacked in a renewed offensive by the German and Austro-Hungarian forces in October 1915. Bulgaria then declared war and attacked shortly after. Despite limited assistance from Serbia’s allies, Belgrade soon fell. Outnumbered and under-equipped, the Serbian army was facing annihilation. Unable to link up with advancing British and French divisions, C-in-C Marshal Putnik ordered a full retreat to the south-west via Montenegro and into Albania.

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The weather was terrible, the roads poor, and the army had to help the tens of thousands of civilians who retreated with them with almost no supplies or food left. Around 200,000 Serbs perished in the Albanian mountains and thousands more perished from disease once evacuated to the Greek island of Corfu. Because of the appalling loss of life, the Serbian army’s retreat through Albania is today considered by many Serbs to be one of the greatest tragedies in their nation’s history.

Заставник 11. пешадијског пука са својим заменицима под Ковиловом Шумадијска дивизија

Post-1915 Uniform and Figures:

The remaining Serbian army needed new equipment and uniforms from their allies before it could rejoin the front line and take on the Bulgarian, Germans and Austrians to liberate their homeland. I’ve painted Strelets’ ‘post-retreat’ uniforms separately as examples of the later war Serbian soldiers that liberated their nation. On the uniforms, Serbia.com has this to say:

“The part of the Serbian army that survived the retreat through Albania, arrived at Corfu in torn and dishevelled uniforms. After recovery, the Allies gave them new uniforms such as the French “Blue Horizon” (fr. horizon bleu) and the British “Khaki”.

And from Osprey’s “Armies in the Balkans 1914-18“;

“Other ranks were issued with M1915 French ‘horizon blue’ field uniform, the M1915 French African Army khaki version; or the M1902 British service dress uniform…(with) the French Adrian helmet with Serbian badge.”

Naturally, for my Strelets figures I went for the less common M1915 French African Army khaki version. My Osprey guide’s illustration of this uniform didn’t seem a close colour match for examples I found on the web. So, I’ve gone with the web versions instead.

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Museum exhibit of the French African army uniform.

I was anxious to get the right colour for the French African Adrian helmets, a kind of rusty brass.  I like to think that my mixing of gunmetal and red leather colours was very successful – I’m really pleased with it. Trouble is, with the metallic shine it doesn’t come out very well in photos!

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Late War Serbian Infantry (14)

Four of these late war figures are armed with the French Chauchat light machine gun which had a wooden handle and stock. It used an unusual half-moon magazine which held up to 20 8mm Lebel rounds. It was a light, portable gun that could be mass-produced quickly, cheaply, and in very large numbers.

Late War Serbian Infantry (13)

However, it was certainly not without problems, indeed according to this short YouTube film, it was considered to be ‘the worst machine gun ever’, being hopelessly susceptible to defective magazines, constant jamming, overheating and a heavy recoil with inherently inaccurate sights!

My officer is depicted still retaining his Serbian hat, which was apparently still a usual post-evacuation feature…

…and some of his men still wear the Opanci peasant footwear with embroidered socks.

Late War Serbian Infantry (10)

All in all, these Serbian Infantry in Winter Dress have been very reasonable figures. I personally like a little more crispness of detail, especially in the faces, but the choice of army was an inspired choice for Strelets – bravo!

Late War Serbian Infantry (5)

Late War Serbian Infantry (4)

Late War Serbian Infantry (3)

Coming up next:

I’ve got some WWI figures lined up. However, following on from my recent post about female soldiers in the Serbian army, I will be supporting #FEMbruary. More on that in the next post…!

 

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5 thoughts on “Serbia is Saved! Late WWI Serbian Infantry (1916-18)

    1. Thank you – my chosen figure is already on its way over from Bad Squiddo… Lots of other great figures on there that I reckon it won’t be the last either.

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  1. I am from Serbia and thank you for your efforts for presenting my country. I have one suggestion to write name of battles where uniforms where used. Figure are great just keep the hard work.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I just saw the other post that have name of the battles. Thank you even more for this kind of presentation of my peoplein the WW1,and of course thanks for making all this figure.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m very pleased that you liked them. I really enjoyed researching the history of Serbia in WWI and bringing its soldiers to life by painting these figures. I also posted on the history: https://suburbanmilitarism.wordpress.com/2018/01/28/soldiers-of-serbia/
      and also on Serbia’s female soldiers in WW1:
      https://suburbanmilitarism.wordpress.com/2018/02/08/heroic-female-soldiers-of-serbia/

      Thank you for taking an interest and for your kind comments!

      Marvin

      Like

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