Gabions Galore

In my last post I indicated the purchase of something to assist my latest project painting which is 17th century Ottoman Turkish artillery by RedBox. I’ve discovered some siege equipment, wicker gabions cast in resin, for sale on the internet.

A wicker gabion

If, like me, you’re not that familiar with early siege defences, then you may appreciate a little explanation courtesy of Wikipedia:


Early gabions were round cages with open tops and bottoms, made from wickerwork and filled with earth for use as military fortifications. These early military gabions were most often used to protect sappers and siege artillery gunners. The wickerwork cylinders were light and could be carried relatively conveniently in the ammunition train, particularly if they were made in several diameters to fit one inside another. At the site of use in the field, they could be stood on end, staked in position, and filled with soil to form an effective wall around the gun, or rapidly construct a bulletproof parapet along a sap.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabion
Pégard, engraver [Public domain] via Wikimedia Commons

Cheap, quick and effective construction pieces even today, they are still a popular form of erosion control and landscaping. The side of motorways are commonly lined with metal cages filled with rocks; the modern alternative to wicker cylinders filled with earth.

An artillery emplacement of gabions by Anyscale Models

Anyscale Models produce four fabulous resin artillery screens of wicker gabions for just over £5, which allows me to protect eight of my gun teams for a very reasonable price. Manufacturer of my Ottoman Turks, RedBox, actually make their own 17th Century battlefield accessory set, but for the same price I would only get 3 gabions, not 48! Unfortunately for me, Anyscale Models’ main focus seems to be the 20th century and these are something of an anomaly.

A 1/72 scale Ottoman Topçu Ocağı mortar crew shelter behind the gabions.

My gabions are billed as being suitable for 20 -28mm scale and so should suit RedBox’s Turkish cannon and crews very well. They come in two different types, the slightly more expansive of the two are intended to be used for my larger calibre guns. These gabions will, of course, require some painting, so we will see how that goes!

Meanwhile, the painting of my Turkish topçu (artillerymen) progresses very well and I should have the two 8-strong gun crews from my first box of Turkish Artillery (17th Century) painted soon. With up to four more sets from RedBox’s range of Ottoman Artillery to choose from, if I’m happy with the end result, then I may well need more gabions…

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