The 37th Stands at Ease…

Based and almost ready for action: men of the 37th (North Hampshire) Regiment of Foot stand at ease.

Prior to basing, they experienced a pre-emptive strike by my young cat, Marnie. She accidentally knocked them all off the table and they consequently suffered a little from a hard landing on the kitchen floor. I’ve tried to cover over areas of chipped paint but a few areas inevitably have been missed, I’m afraid.

I like the individuality of the figures, I’m particularly fond of this little private conversation going on in the rear rank…

“So, let me get this straight. We ‘ere because we ‘ere?…”
The scene just moments before an irritated Pioneer Sergeant swings his axe behind him.

The 37th Regiment featured in many significant campaigns and battles of the 18th century, including the battles of Blenheim, Quebec, Dettingen, Culloden, and Brandywine, amongst others. It spent much of the Napoleonic Wars on garrison duty in the West Indies and Gibraltar but did, however, serve in the closing stages of the Peninuslar War in 1814 where it won a battle honour.

It was absent from the Waterloo campaign, being sent for service in Canada. So perhaps it’s quite appropriate that these Waterloo-era figures to appear in such a casual and relaxed state?

As we are in Spring here in the UK, I’ve based them in a springlike meadow with flowers and lush grass. Bees are buzzing and birds are singing in this pastoral lull with the thought of hostilities far from their minds.

Below, a private in the rear rank seems more interested in the pleasures of the baggage train to the rear than any enemy to the front…

Tricky to pick out the details but nevertheless great fun to do. I’ve still got some officers to share for this group, whenever I get around to finishing them.

For a fabulous example of what can be achieved with this range of Strelets ‘non-combat’ figures, hop on over to Pat’s 1:72 Military Diorama’s
blog and view his Peninsular War “Retreat to Corunna” diorama – endlessly interesting and with nearly 270 figures, a damn sight more ambitious than my own little line up!

As for me, I do still have a couple of sprues spare and was thinking of producing some Rifle Brigade or Belgian Infantry figures sometime too.

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2 thoughts on “The 37th Stands at Ease…

  1. Well mate these lads turned out really well even though they have been through the wars so to speak! ,funny about cats we had just given one of our daughters a cat for her birthday and I had just finished my first dio the Napoleonic one ,as I enter the room the cat was sitting at the other end of the sideboard on which the dio sat and to my horror she got up and walked towards me across it length wise ! .After the family had calmed me down, I could not find one figure out of place ,quite amazing really .
    I like the little conversation scene ,nicely done ,and I have to thank you for the shout out ,I couldn’t work out why I was getting so much traffic as I hadn’t posted anything, much appreciated .
    Now I’m asking for a favour ,the extra sprue you mentioned please paint them up as my favourite boys the 95th I love to see your style on them ,and believe me you have a different way of painting which I like .I like to call it ones thumb print ,stolen from a Thai chef who once told me that if you gave a group of people, the same ingredients and recipe, the ones with style will all make it just a little bit different from the others. Well Marvin mate on that note of waffle you can now go off a paint up those rifle boys ,cheers Pat

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your kind words, if you think my figures have got style, then I’m happy!

      Cats and figures really don’t go together well in my experience. I like the phrase “after my family calmed me down…” 🙂 I would have fainted!

      As fpr the 95th, I was thinking of painting those remainders as Rifles anyway so, I don’t need any persuading. I’ve part way in to something else already, but I’ll get round to them when I can 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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