Strelets Standing Soldiers: Napoleon!

Having showcased the Old Guard figures in my last post, as promised I’ve now painted the head honcho himself – L’empereur Napoleon Bonaparte!

It’s my submission for Ann’s Immaterium’s April Painting Challenge!

You’ll notice that I’ve thrown some sand down to act as an ersatz parade ground and pressed my 18th century country house into action once again (last seen acting as a St. Petersburg palace).

Forming a hollow square, my Old Guard are waiting to listen to him say a final farewell, prior to leaving for exile on the island of Elba.

Eventually, he appears before them, wearing his traditional bicorne hat and long grey coat. The emperor is visibly emotional. His voice, passionate and breaking, echoes across the parade ground as he begins…

You can now view the epic scene in this YouTube movie what I made:

Alternatively, the non-video version of my scene is below:


“Soldiers of my Old Guard, after 20 years I have come to say goodbye!”
(a dramatic pause ensues)
“France has fallen! So remember me!”
Très dramatique, non?
“Though I love you all, I cannot embrace you all...” (now, you wouldn’t catch Wellington saying that!)
“With this kiss, remember me!” (relief all round – it’s just the flag he’s snogging)
“Goodbye my soldiers!…”
“Goodbye my sons!…”
“Goodbye, my children!!!!”

The scene was brought to you with apologies to Orson Welles, Dino De Laurentiis and Rod Steiger. Any resemblance to actual films, past or present, is entirely intentional – The original, and in my view vastly inferior, scene is viewable on YouTube.

To help my painting of Strelets’ Boney, as a guide I settled on some portraits of him wearing a grey overcoat and the uniform of a colonel of the Chasseurs a Cheval. He seems to be consistently shown wearing a silver medal with a red ribbon, so I’ve reproduced that too.

Is it me, or does my Napoleon have more than a passing resemblance to Marlon Brando?

There was also the small matter of finishing my pioneer sergeant. Admittedly, it looks a little like he’s wearing a skirt with an apron but, given the size of his axe, I won’t be saying that to his face.

And with that, this submission for “Paint the Crap You Already Own” is complete. Needless to say, there’s plenty more I could get my teeth into and with some days left yet of April, I may yet even have a go at something else.

Until then, I say – goodbye my followers, goodbye my visitors, and goodbye my children!!!!

18 thoughts on “Strelets Standing Soldiers: Napoleon!

  1. Wow, very cool, and even with a video presentation to go along with it! Hmm … I never really thought about it before but now that you mention it, Napoleon does look a little like Brando. One of course wonders if Napoleon did that on purpose of it was just a happy accident? 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Ha, thanks Ann – I’m thinking that maybe it’s just the sculptor can only do Marlon Brando faces. Underneath the moustaches of the Old Guard, they might all look like Brando! 😀

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks Ian, the video is just a bit of nonsense that appealed to my sense of humour!

      The building is a stately home in”18th Century European Buildings” from the “Paperboys on Campaign” series of books. There are windmill’s, farmhouses, walls, bridges, etc, etc all can be cut out on card and are reprintable in you photocopy them. Useful for quick and cheap wargame buildings!

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Hey mate Napoleon came up really well when you painted him up ,he didn’t look much in the PSR, well done, and yeah you have got your moneys worth out of that building ,a great backdrop for you shoots!! and the video was spec!!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Cheers Pat. That Napoleon figure took a bit of work to get him looking half-decent. Italeri’s mounted version was a lot more lively looking.

    Hearing the dramatic delivery of Rod Steiger over scenes of my little 20mm Napoleon did make me laugh 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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