British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century: The 3rd Dragoon Guards

A series of regular blog posts displaying images from “British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century”; a set of trade cards issued by Badshah Tea Co. of London in 1963. 


#23: The 3rd Dragoon Guards

“The Dragoon Guards originated in 1685 as Cuirassiers and in 1746 they were called the 3rd Regiment of Dragoon Guards. In 1922 they were amalgamated with the 6th Dragoon Guards to form the Prince of Wales’ Dragoon Guards. This is an officer in mid-Victorian times.”

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Officer, 3rd Dragoon Guards, c.1860.

Sites of interest about the 3rd Dragoon Guards:

The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards museum in Edinburgh Castle has exhibits on the 3rd Dragoons Guards (Prince of Wales’ Own).

The National Army Museum’s page on the 3rd Dragoon Guards.

The website of the Cheshire Military Museum covers the 3rd Carabiniers. This regiment was formed in 1922 following the amalgamation of the 3rd Dragoon Guards (Prince of Wales’s) and the 6th Dragoon Guards.

Quick March music of the 3rd Dragoon Guards on YouTube.

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British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century: The 4th Queen’s Own Dragoons

A series of regular blog posts displaying images from “British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century”; a set of trade cards issued by Badshah Tea Co. of London in 1963. 


#22: The 4th Queens Own Dragoons

“The regiment was raised in 1685 and numbered the 4th in 1742. In 1788 it became the 4th Queen’s Own Dragoons and was then converted to Hussars in 1861. The uniform of the regiment as it was about 1808 is shown here.”

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Trooper, 4th Queen’s Own Dragoons, c.1808.

Sites of interest about the 4th Queen’s Own Dragoons:

The International Churchill society have this detailed history on Winston Churchill and his time in the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars.

The Wikipedia page on the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars.

A good summary of the regiment’s history here on “The British Empire” website.

The museum of the Queen’s Royal Irish Hussars in Eastbourne, East Sussex.

British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century: The 14th Light Dragoons

A series of regular blog posts displaying images from “British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century”; a set of trade cards issued by Badshah Tea Co. of London in 1963. 


#21: The 14th Light Dragoons

“The regiment was raised as Dragoons in 1715, converted to Light Dragoons in 1776, to Hussars in 1861 and in 1922 was amalgamated with the 20th Hussars. This is an officer of the regiment at the beginning of the 19th Century.”

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Officer, 14th Light Dragoons, c.1800.

Sites of interest about the 14th Light Dragoons:

The Museum of Lancashire in Preston houses a gallery dedicated to the 14th/20th King’s Hussars and it’s precedents including the 14th Light Dragoons.

In 2016, I painted Warwickshire Yeomanry Cavalry using 28mm Perry Miniatures Light Dragoons in this same guise (wearing the Tarleton helmet, etc) albeit with different colours.

A good summary of the regiment’s history here on “The British Empire” website.

British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century: 14th Light Dragoons

A series of regular blog posts displaying images from “British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century”; a set of trade cards issued by Badshah Tea Co. of London in 1963. 


#11: The 14th Light Dragoons

“This regiment was raised as Dragoons in 1715, converted to Light Dragoons in 1776, to Hussars in 1861 and in 1922 was amalgamated with the 20th Hussars. This is an officer of the regiment at the beginning of the 19th Century.”

 

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Officer, 14th Light Dragoons (c.1808)

 

Sites of interest about the 14th Light Dragoons:

National Army Museum page on the 14th Light Dragoons (who later became the 12th Royal Lancers).

My own painted Light Dragoons (the 13th Regt) from the same era from the Nappy Cavalry Project.

The Light Dragoons Regimental Association.

The British Army at Waterloo: Impressively painted figures of the 12th Light Dragoons at Waterloo. This blog features one man’s project that aims to represent every British soldier at Waterloo (31,500 men) in 28mm figures.