British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century: The 3rd (King’s Own) Light Dragoons

A series of regular blog posts displaying images from “British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century”; a set of trade cards issued by Badshah Tea Co. of London in 1963. 


#16: The 3rd (King’s Own) Light Dragoons

“This was one of the regiments of Dragoons raised in 1685 by James II at the time of the Monmouth Rebellion. This is a trooper in the uniform of about 1832 with the red jacket favoured by William IV. In 1861, the 3rd converted to Hussars.”

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Trooper, 3rd (King’s Own) LD, c. 1832.

Sites of interest about the 3rd (King’s Own) Light Dragoons / Hussars:

National Army Museum page on the 3rd (King’s Own) Light Dragoons (who later became the 3rd King’s Own Hussars).

The Queen’s Own Hussars Museum web page on the history of the regiment. This museum is due to be re-homed  from it’s original premises in the ancient Lord Leycester’s Hospital in Warwick. You can visit the website on the relocation project and donate here.

Extensive Wikipedia page on the 3rd (King’s Own) Hussars.

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British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century: 7th Queens Own Light Dragoons

A series of regular blog posts displaying images from “British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century”; a set of trade cards issued by Badshah Tea Co. of London in 1963. 


#13: 7th Queens Own Light Dragoons

“This regiment was raised as Dragoons in 1689 and was then known as Cunningham’s Regiment of Dragoons. The regiment was then converted to Light Dragoons in 1783 and to Hussars in 1807. An officer in the uniform of 1805  is depicted on this card.”

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Officer, 7th Queens Own Light Dragoons (c.1805)

Sites of interest about the 7th Queens Own Light Dragoons:

National Army Museum page on the 7th Queens Own Light Dragoons (later the 7th Hussars).

Website of the Queens Own Hussars Museum. By the end of 2017, the MoD requires the Regiment to close the existing museum and re-house it with the Queens Royal Irish Hussars Museum at one site. Donations are being sought here.

And finally, I have a vague idea of painting this very regiment and adding them to the Nappy Cavalry Project using Zvezda’s Prussian Black Hussars from the 7 Years War…

British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century: 14th Light Dragoons

A series of regular blog posts displaying images from “British Cavalry Uniforms of the 19th Century”; a set of trade cards issued by Badshah Tea Co. of London in 1963. 


#11: The 14th Light Dragoons

“This regiment was raised as Dragoons in 1715, converted to Light Dragoons in 1776, to Hussars in 1861 and in 1922 was amalgamated with the 20th Hussars. This is an officer of the regiment at the beginning of the 19th Century.”

 

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Officer, 14th Light Dragoons (c.1808)

 

Sites of interest about the 14th Light Dragoons:

National Army Museum page on the 14th Light Dragoons (who later became the 12th Royal Lancers).

My own painted Light Dragoons (the 13th Regt) from the same era from the Nappy Cavalry Project.

The Light Dragoons Regimental Association.

The British Army at Waterloo: Impressively painted figures of the 12th Light Dragoons at Waterloo. This blog features one man’s project that aims to represent every British soldier at Waterloo (31,500 men) in 28mm figures.

Exciting News!

I’m delighted to announce some rather exciting news regarding my figures. Having recently painted the Warwickshire Yeomanry figures, I hit upon an idea. Recalling from a previous visit that the Warwickshire Yeomanry Museum had a very impressive collection of model soldiers, I wondered whether they might be interested in my own humble efforts (using figures by Perry Miniatures) at depicting the early incarnation of its regiment .

Earlier today, I revisited the museum in Warwick where Trustee Mr Philip Wilson graciously accepted them as an acquisition to be displayed on permanent loan!

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I’m especially pleased that these figures will be on display here at this venue because in my opinion the Warwickshire Yeomanry Museum is especially good. It is a provincial regimental Museum staffed and supported by volunteers only. These volunteers bring not only great enthusiasm, but an extensive knowledge and understanding of the regiment and its history, and this is reflected in the high quality of the displays and exhibits.

Great exhibits and fascinating artefacts (not to say great model soldiers), abound. For this fan of military art, the museum seems especially blessed with great paintings, prints, caricatures and other illustrations. I saw a number of originals from which I based the painting of my own figures, including the oil painting of an officer of the 4th Kineton Troop. Many of my favourite artists, such as Simkin and Orlando Norie, are in evidence, but the jewel in the crown is undoubtedly the original painting of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry’s glorious charge at Huj by the famed Lady Butler .

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Lady Butler’s “Charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry at Huj”.

All of this (now including my painted figures of course), is accomodated in a splendidly renovated basement of the Court House in Warwick. Temporarily housed in one on the display cabinets, my figures will be soon moved to another cabinet within which is housed an original WYC Tarleton helmet, sabres and ephemera relating to the early period in the regiment’s history. A more suitable place for them in the museum, I couldn’t imagine!

Whilst signing over my figures into the care of the museum, Mr Wilson kindly showed me facsimiles of beautiful illustrations of the regiment engaged in sword drill. It is gratifying to note that these pictures suggest a type of jacket closer to those on my figures than I had originally thought possible.

It was also suggested that the Warwickshire Yeomanry Museum’s own website might soon be updated with photos of my figures on display. None of my figures have ever been on any kind of public display before and I don’t mind admitting that I’m very gratified some are now appearing in such a fine museum. Following all the positive testimony I’ve given in this post, I do therefore heartily recommend giving the (free admission!) Warwickshire Yeomanry Museum a visit. You will find knowledgable and friendly staff on hand and, of course, my figures are now on display there!

Further information on the Warwickshire Yeomanry Museum website can be accessed here

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Acquisition form: Proudly signing my figures over to the museum’s collection!

The Warwickshire Yeomanry Cavalry…at last!

At long last, they’re finished! I started the Warwickshire Yeomanry figures back in February of this year, but with other projects and duties demanding my attention, it’s been a long time before I could get around to finishing them off.

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These are the first 28mm cavalry that I’ve painted. I’m fairly pleased with the end result, there’s always something to be improved upon, but they’ll do nicely. I’ve learnt to accept the numerous compromises necessary in depicting these figures as yeomanry and I think they make a good impression of the WYC in the Napoleonic period.

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I’ve added some carbines to five of the figures, representing the limited number of each troop which would be so armed.

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Trooper with carbine.

It should be admitted that the officer still requires the end of his shabraque completing as I’ve procrastinated as to how to do this. He has a sabretache with the letters WYC (more or less!) upon it. The sabretache design is based on one in service from the 1850s, evidence of anything from earlier in the regimental history being absent.

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Officer of the WYC

Photos of the final 5 figures and indeed the entire completed regiment below!