Presenting Belgium’s Carabinier Cyclists!

My latest venture into WWI figures is complete. HaT’s choice of figures is an inspired one, the Belgian army’s bicyclists being both an interesting and somewhat neglected subject. Much like Belgium itself, the bicycle’s contribution to the Great War can be easily overlooked, yet both played a small but nonetheless significant role in the conflict. Mark at Man of Tin blog, however, has mentioned that the same figures have at least been previously produced in 15mm scale by Peter Laing.

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HaT’s figures are a great attempt a reproducing something which I imagine is extremely complicated to replicate on a 1/72 scale plastic sprue; a bicycle and a rider with rifle over the shoulder.

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Belgian Carabinier Cyclists (25)

That said, some poses I found easier to construct than others and the figure requiring both of their fiddly arms and handlebars all attaching and gluing together was far beyond my ability to make look acceptable! The four separate poses supplied in the box are below:-

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I’ve based on them on what I hoped would look something like a flat dirt track, a little off-roading which would be well within the capability of these Carabiniers on their ‘Belgica’ cycles and made even easier by Belgium’s flat landscape.

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Belgian Carabinier Cyclists (6)

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Belgian Carabinier Cyclists (13)

I think the poses are very good too. Maybe some extra dismounted poses would have been even better, with some carabiniers engaged in a fire fight, cycles lying flat on the ground? Can’t complain, though. Extremely fiddly assembly aside, these figures have been really interesting to research and good to paint – a great addition to my Great War project.


And with that, it’s time to look to the next painting task. I have many possibilities and kits coming out of my ears, so too much choice is the problem as ever. What’s more, there are also a few other posts to come to tell of my recent trips out and about. In the meantime, if you’d like to review the other WWI figures I’ve painted so far, feel free to visit my page on the Great War!

Best wishes,

Marvin

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Belgium’s Carabinier Bicyclists

“The reasons of the success of the soldier-cyclist are not far to seek. In the first place it must be realised that his mount, unlike that of the cavalryman, is silent in progress. This gives him an enormous advantage over his noisy foe… But silence is by no means the cyclist’s sole advantage. He has a good turn of speed, which is a factor useful alike in attack and retreat.

“… the ability to take cover often spells the difference between victory and defeat, and here the cyclist scores distinctly. He has but to lay his mount down flat upon the ground and it is practically invisible.” Cycling Weekly Magazine, October 1914.

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Cycling and Soldiering

Cycling and soldiering may at first appear to some to seem almost mutually exclusive. Cycling, particularly of the sort from over a century ago, may suggest a rather quaint pursuit. It may bring to mind scenes of gently wayfaring Edwardian ladies riding prettily through leafy English lanes, or middle class gentlemen with their tweed suits and flat caps. Yet, as the mass industrialised slaughter of the Great War began, cyclist battalions were a common feature in many armies. Indeed, the very first British army casualty of the Great War was to be a cyclist.

On August 21, 1914, in southern Belgium, a 17-year old British soldier named John Henry Parr was sent on a mission with another reconnaissance cyclist to obtain information on the German army’s position. While offering covering fire for his comrade, who escaped on his bike, Parr was shot and killed, thus becoming the first British soldier to die in the Great War. The Bicycle Times, “From the Archives – World War I: Cycling Into Battle”, 27 Dec 2016.

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Germany, USA, Austria, Italy, Russia, Japan, France, Belgium and others all had their own cycling forces too. Great Britain had 14,000 cyclist troops in 1914. In the French and Belgian forces during WWI, an estimated 150,000 troops had made use of the army bicycle at various times. The practice was by no means exclusive to WWI, either. In fact, I painted some metal WWII Dutch army cyclists by Early War Miniatures for a Benno’s Figures Forum Group Build a couple of years ago. Surprisingly perhaps, the practice continues right up to the present day with some troops adopting the cycle for patrols even when deployed in global hotspots.

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German army cyclists, c.1910

The use of the bicycle in warfare first began to be initially explored in the British army by militia and volunteers, not in the more conservative regulars. Cyclist manoeuvres involving volunteer units was first held in 1880 and repeatedly thereafter gathering support amongst those who could see in their use great tactical advantage, speed of movement, and affordability. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle even argued the case for the Yeomanry switching from horse to cycles. Bicycles, it was argued, were silent and swift, increasing mobility on the battlefield for troops. They enabled soldiers to carry more equipment and were far easier to replace when compared to horses or vehicles and required minimal maintenance.

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The Anglo-Boer War gave the first significant opportunity for the British army to explore the bicycle in warfare. It was used by both the British and the Boers, although it met with some opposition by disdainful cavalry commanders at the time. It also came in for criticism as some general staff questioned its ultimate value on the rugged terrain of the ‘trackless veldt’.

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Caption reads: “A man of the “Handy Corps” –
“Handy afoot, handy awheel swift as a bolt from the blue,
Ready to ride and ready to tramp, seeing the business through;
Always there in the nick of time, always right up to the fore,
Eager to take their share in this fight are the men of the Handy Corps”

The BSA and Military Bicycle Museum describes the types of bicycle used by the military:

“There were two types of military bicycle: the roadster and the folding bicycle. Armies experimented with bicycles from the earliest era, but they were not generally accepted until cycle design had evolved sufficiently to produce a robust machine capable of withstanding typical military use. Roadsters were ideal for dispatch riders. Folding bikes were used first by Italian and French armies, and the Faun design, patented in 1896, was used by various British manufacturers, culminating in BSA’s well-known WW1 Folding Bicycle.” The BSA and Military Bicycle Museum

Belgian’s Bicycle Battalions

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With the advent of WWI, the thickly-roaded districts of France and Flanders meant that military cyclists would find the ground better suited for their wheels than combatants found in the South African veldt. The flat landscape of the low countries meant that Belgium in particular was an ideal environment for military cyclists and they were well used in the initial stages before the static stalemate of the trenches set in.

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French WWI chasseur cyclists by the roadside.

Four Carabinier battalions of the Belgian army had attached companies of cyclists. They wore a distinctive uniform with a somewhat old-fashioned peaked hat similar to a kepi. Their cycles were the “Belgica” which was a foldable cycle. This allowed the bicycle to be slung across the shoulder when encountering difficult terrain.

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A dedicated military cycling school in Belgium provided troops with specific training in reading maps, reconnaissance and communication techniques, as well as the mechanical skills needed to maintain the bicycles. Innovation with the military bicycle was rife:

While attempts to convert them into actual weapons by mounting machine guns on handlebars and makeshift sidecars ultimately failed, the bicycle did prove to be very adaptable during the war. Bicycle ambulances were created by welding two bicycles together, side by side, and placing a stretcher in between them. Tandem bikes allowed for a primary pilot to sit at the front and a gunner at the rear. And some bikes were rigged to tow machine guns and other small artillery into position. The Bicycle Times.

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The German invasion of Belgium began on 4 August 1914 and their own Jaeger cyclists went ahead of the infantry with leaflets requesting calm from Belgian civilians. Reconnaissance was often made by bicycle but the cyclist troops were also often hotly engaged, being the first into contact with the enemy. At the very first battle in Belgium, at Halen, the Belgians successfully repulsed German cavalry attacks with a force which included a company of 450 cyclists. Their concealed massed rifle fire inflicted large casualties upon the Germans.

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Model soldier manufacturer HaT has recently produced a couple of WWI cyclist sets for German Jaeger and Belgian Carabinier cyclists, and it’s the latter which I’m currently working on for my latest edition in my WWI project.

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My assistant presents…

The cycles themselves are already painted, as you can see below, and are simply awaiting their riders which I’ll be presenting as soon as I’ve finished painting and mounting them on their bikes!

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Parked ready for their cyclists – a dozen 1/72 scale WWI Belgian army bicycles.

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Exhausted Belgian army cyclists at rest by a roadside.

 

Dutch Infantry Cyclists

Well, this has been a challenge! My contribution to the Bennos Figures Forum group build has seen me well out of my comfort zone. Metal figures, the WWII era, civilians, never mind those bicycles, none of these are something I’m used to painting!

I’m finding that metal figures at 1/72 scale don’t enjoy the same level of detail as plastic figures. My usual approach to painting is to reveal the detail that the sculptor has provided his model with by a careful application of shading. With the same high-level of detail as plastic figures being unavoidably absent for metal ones, I’ve come to the realisation that a slightly different approach is needed. It’s the kind of painting development which takes time to develop through experience, but I don’t have the time as I’m on a deadline for the Group Build!

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So, I’ve just had to go with what I’ve got. I hope I’ve not done Early War Miniatures an injustice as I send them over to Europe to join the other figures in the project. Here they are as they get close to completion. Amongst other things, I’ve still got to paint and glue on their rifles, but I’ll do them last as they look a little fragile.

The Cyclists:

The Civilians:

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The scene: One cyclist dismounts to speak to the young blond lady that’s caught his eye…

I’m hoping that group build ‘project lead’ Jan will provide the diorama itself, using my figures in something like the set up shown above. Once these are finished, I’ll send them over to Germany for him to work his magic!

The Road to Arnhem!

At last! My figures from Early War Miniatures have finally arrived. These are metal 1/72 scale Dutch infantry cyclists from (as the manufacturer’s name suggests) the early period of WWII, prior to the German invasion of the low countries.

They are going to be my contribution to the latest Benno’s Figures Forum group build project for 2016. Last year featured a build to commemorate the 200th anniersary of the Battle of Waterloo and inspired my subsequent Nappy Cavalry Project. This year, project lead Mabo has come up with the following idea which he’s called “The Road to Arnhem”.

My idea is to create a special diorama, that features an ideal of a street leading to Arnhem, the home of the FIGZ, throughout all time periods. So in the end we will have parts that are 10 square centimetre and [are put] together in a long row sorted into time periods.

Think about scenes that could have happened: Stone age people hunting, Celts riding, Romans, exploring, Franks travelling, Knights fighting, medival people discussing, Bandit waiting for a treasurer, Landsknechts resting, civilians farming, British troops travelling to Hannover, Nappies running around everywhere, the Great War, A Bridge to far and finally the modern times…

So, with that in mind, here is my idea… The year is 1940, it is during the period of the so-called ‘phoney war’ and in these uneasy times a small Dutch infantry platoon of cyclists is out on manoeuvres near Arnhem…

You’ll see a couple of ‘stunt cyclists’ in the above pictures which, ah, probably won’t be included. I’m now waiting for some paints to come through to help me with the Dutch army uniform (for which great advice I must thank my Dutch friend Michael from Benno’s Forum). I’ve also ordered some civilian figures which I hope might act as bystanders and which will hopefully help me provide some sort of narrative. Perhaps one of the cyclists dismounts and speaks to a young lady who catches his eye?

And in other news… I’ve been asked to produce some painted figures for the young son of a friend. Not sure what to paint at the moment, though something Napoleonic seems to be the brief. With so much on here at Suburban Militarism, I’m going to be hard pushed to find time, though of course I’m very happy to make this a priority. After all, I could be encouraging a modeller or wargamer of the future!