Warsaw at War: 13th Regiment of Polish Infantry

I can confirm that the last of my Strelets Polish Infantry on the March box are now fully painted and based. Minor quibbles aside (those muskets seem a little bendy), Strelets deserve to be applauded for this set which is impressively sculpted.

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13th regt polish infantry (14)

The 13th Regiment was the only Napoleonic Polish regiment to wear white instead of blue uniforms. Apparently this was because they wore uniforms which had been captured from the Austrian army.

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Officer

13th Regt Polish Infantry (8)

The drummer was painted based on a depiction in a watercolour I found on the web. I do like the light blue Czapka, red lapels and white uniform colour scheme! Hopefully, he looks similar to the painting? Oh darn it, I’ve just noticed that his collar is the wrong colour…

The flag bearer had a bare plastic flag attached which required me to paint the details on its curved surface. I wasn’t sure what the flag would have looked like for the 13th regiment and so I simply copied one depicted belonging to another regiment. The result is hardly a masterpiece as I didn’t spend too long working on it, but I’m happy enough with it and I enjoyed the challenge.

And so, that’s all the Napoleonic Poles completed. My next painting challenge is already well under way. It’s another new Strelets set but the era is completely different. I can announce that for 2018, Suburban Militarism will be venturing into the First World War.

Men in White Coats

My 13th Regiment of Polish infantry are slowly approaching completion. With an all white uniform and light blue facings, the challenge is to avoid them looking a little too luminous and bright, yet still pleasingly colourful.

ce01a6b42cbd60b2a2b92a115eaf82ad I’ve used ‘turquoise’ rather than light blue for their facings simply because I preferred the shade (so there!).

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In progress: The 13th Regiment of the Polish army.

I started to paint the drummer in reverse colours until I found a print showing the 13th drummer in white, reversing the blue lapel colour with the red cord colour. So, I’ve gone back to the start with that figure. I’m a little apprehensive about painting a heraldic double-headed eagle onto an uneven surface (i.e. on to the draped flag). The results could be comical!

Polish Infantry Two (1)

I think my ultimate aim with these figures is to place them as if taking part in an advance across a battlefield. Hence, unlike with the previous regiment, I’ve left the bayonets in place. In the meantime, the equipment and muskets are still to do, not forgetting the regimental flag and the drummer too. Updates to follow once these are done…

Polish Infantry on the March

I’ve now finally completed my 20 figures of Strelets’ Polish Napoleonic Infantry! I decided that it would be fun to place them in a mini diorama, marching wearily along some muddy country lane, mud on their boots and trousers.

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They are the 12th Infantry Regiment, which wore the usual dark blue coat (called a kurtka) but were distinguished in the Polish army by their unique yellow collars.

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I think they look rather impressive and a clear improvement on many of their figures from the past.

I’m already working on the rest of the box; 24 figures which include the four command figures (flag bearer, officer, NCO and drummer). This will be the 13th Regiment. Being a chap that always likes to paint something a little different to keep me interested, I’ve selected this regiment because (unique amongst Napoleonic Polish infantry) they wore white uniforms. These were in fact captured Austrian infantry uniforms which sported a fetching light blue colour for the lapels, collars and cuffs.

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13th Regiment, Polish Legion.

With 24 figures to paint, it will take me a fair while to get them finished. I’m enjoying my painting however, so it’s not a chore. The white uniforms are already done and I will be adding some light blue for the facings next. I’ll post an update once I’ve got something decent to share!

I like my military music, so I’ll sign off with a video of Polish Army Band marching through London in 2015 wearing dark blue uniforms and Czapka helmets similar to their Napoleonic ancestors that I’m painting.

Bye for now,

Marvin

12th Polish Regiment (2)

 

Poland Is Not Yet Lost!

 We'll cross the Vistula, we'll cross the Warta,
 We shall be Polish.
 Bonaparte has given us the example
 Of how we should prevail.
"Mazurek Dąbrowskiego" (Poland is not lost); 
Polish National Anthem.

Happy New Year from Suburban Militarism!

The 1st of January is a time for reflection on past achievements and future intentions. 2017 saw yet more regiments added to the Napoleonic Cavalry Project; a 28mm Victorian rifle volunteers project; some 18th century British infantry painted for the Bennos’ Figures Forum group project; a number of museum visit reports were added; and I ended the year creating some Christmas cavalry and painting lots of marching Napoleonic French infantry.

As for 2018, in my previous post I alluded to receiving a generous number of new model soldier kits as Christmas (and birthday) presents. With these kits, there’s a definite East European theme taking shape for 2018 and – dare I say it – a distinct focus on the First World War too (in a departure from my more usual 18th/19th centuries). But it’s familiar Napoleonic territory to start the year as I launch straight into the first of these new kits; the newly released Strelets Polish Infantry on the March.

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My assistant kindly displays one of my (many) soldier-related Christmas gifts.

These Napoleonic figures represent men of the Polish Legions, a force formed by Polish patriots who saw in the rise of Revolutionary France and Napoleon an opportunity to re-establish their nation which was dissolved and partitioned amongst its powerful neighbours in 1795. The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth had been in existence since 1569. Once one of the largest nations in Europe by both size and population, by the time of its eventual demise Russia, Prussia and Austria had all taken a share of the territory.

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Napoleonic Polish infantry in action.

In 1797, two years after partition, a passionate nationalist desire for re-establishing a Polish nation saw a sizeable volunteer “Polish legion” created within Napoleon’s French revolutionary army. At this time, a popular piece of music was written to inspire this new legion which would later become the Polish national anthem; “Poland is Not Lost”.

The Polish Legion fought in many theatres of war with the French including Italy, Haiti, Prussia, Russia and in the Peninsular. Whilst Napoleon was more than keen to use the 20-30,000 highly regarded Polish troops for his military campaigns, he showed less passion for their cause – establishing Poland as a nation. Eventually, a diminished Duchy of Warsaw (under the sway of France) was created, but it was dissolved once more following Napoleon’s eventual defeat.

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Napoleonic Polish troops wore predominantly blue uniforms closely following that of their French sponsors, although a distinct addition was their iconic Czapka helmet. Indeed, the Czapka which was worn by Polish lancers would go on to become a standard feature of most European lancer regiments later in the 19th century.

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My Strelets Polish regiment is the 12th Infantry Regiment. They wear the usual all blue coat and trousers (in summer, they wore white trousers), white lapels, red cuffs and (uniquely) yellow collars. I’m minded to create an alternative Polish regiment with the remainder of the box (which also includes command figures). Possible alternatives could include the 13th Regiment (below left) which wore captured Austrian army uniforms and were therefore predominantly white. Alternatively, I could also produce one of the three “Vistula Legions” (below right), which in addition to the usual blue uniforms featured distinctive yellow lapels, cuffs and collars.

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These slender Strelets figures are a significant departure from much of their early creations, such as the marching French infantry that I’ve just recently finished off. The detail isn’t always as crisp and clear as with some manufacturers making it tricky to paint, but it is sufficient to produce most details adequately. The poses are really effective and there is a nice cohesion to this marching force that was absent in the old French infantry set I’ve just finished with. As with that French set, I’ve cut off their bayonets which would have been unlikely to be fixed when on the march.

I’ve made real progress already thanks to all the free holiday time, and here’s a couple of quick snaps taken in the home and garden of some of the 20 figures I’m working on so far. I’ll update once they’re completed, which hopefully could be by the end of the week.

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