Turkish Topçu

My two teams of Ottoman topçu artillerymen are more or less painted and are awaiting their mighty guns. Not only that, they are also awaiting their gabion protection screen. The diorama bases (one for each gun team) are already in progress and so I should start applying paint to them soon. 

In the meantime, here’s a pictorial review of my (nearly) painted Ottoman topçu.

This artilleryman is opening his powder horn, an item that still requires a little paint…
The ammunition being carried. I’ve supposed the cannonball is made of stone. I particularly like how this man’s coat is pinned back.
The spongeman. The man responsible for ramming home that stone shot. After firing, 
he will then dip his fleecy ramrod into a bucket of water and clean out the barrel of the cannon to make sure there were no sparks to set off the next charge.
I’m no artillery expert but I suppose this man might be a ventsman whose unenviable task was putting a thumb over the touchhole, to stop any premature explosion if any burning particles have been left by a previous shot.

Once the gun is ready, this firer will step in to ignite the charge with his portfire and the cannon will discharge. I am quietly pleased with the burning, glowing end of the cord, a quick job of experimental paint mixing which seemed to work pleasingly well.

This chap with the fez holds a handspike which he will use to help move and re-sight the cannon prior to the next shot.
This artilleryman holds a sledgehammer which is used for some reason which I read about but have since temporarily forgotten! It’s possible that it was used to drive the large cannonballs home or to assist in the repositioning of the cannon, but I’ll find out more…
Commander of gun crew “iki” (number 2). His holdfast on the turban needs attending to.
Commander of gun crew “bir” (one). His feather is still awaiting some paint.
Another portfire holder.

They’re impressive figures by Redbox and I’m quite pleased with the way these Ottoman artillerymen have come out. Well, my next task is diorama making which, as I’ve said, I’m already now under way on, so hopefully something to show at some point in the not-too-distant future.

2 thoughts on “Turkish Topçu

    1. Thanks Pete. They’re really nice sculpts, I think. Curiously, I’m even enjoying the diorama/basing process – not something I usually get on with very well!

      Marvin.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s